Spotlight Sunday: Review ‘The Heiresses’ by Allison Rushby. AWW2013

Welcome to this week’s Spotlight Sunday where I shine the light on an Australian book I think deserves to be read. This week I am shining the spotlight on the YA/NA historical novel’The Heiresses’ by Allison Rushby. This is the tenth book I have read for the Australian Women Writers Challenge.

The Heiresses

The synopsis from Goodreads:
In Allison Rushby’s Heiresses, three triplets–estranged since birth–are thrust together in glittering 1926 London to fight for their inheritance, only to learn they can’t trust anyone–least of all each other.

When three teenage girls, Thalia, Erato and Clio, are summoned to the excitement of fast-paced London–a frivolous, heady city full of bright young things–by Hestia, an aunt they never knew they had, they are shocked to learn they are triplets and the rightful heiresses to their deceased mother’s fortune. All they need to do is find a way to claim the fortune from their greedy half-brother, Charles. But with the odds stacked against them, coming together as sisters may be harder than they think.

My thoughts:

4 out of 5.

What a roller coaster ride this was, so full of twist and turns and surprise after surprise, and the drama, oh the drama! The Heiresses was a thrilling historical family drama revolving around triplets Thalia, Erato(Ro), and Clio. They are brought together in London by Hestia, the aunt they never knew existed. They are told they are rightful heirs to their mother’s fortune, all they have to do is claim it from their half brother Charles, who is not impressed by these girls showing up in his life threatening to cause a scandal that would not look well for his political career.

Each of these girls are completely different, having been brought up in separate households. Thalia is the wild, party-girl flapper, Ro is all brains and logic, and Clio is the quiet, reserved country girl. I have to say out of all their stories I quiet liked Clio’s the best.
Each has a different reason for needing the money, and we follow their journey as they get to know each other as they fight for what is rightfully theirs.

London is a complete different world for all of them, and they are thrust into a lot of new experiences, including first love. Ro loses all logic when it comes to the handsome Dr.Vincent Allington, and both Thalia and Clio, in their own way, fall for the wild, party loving Edwin, who has more depth to him than he allows anyone to see.

Thalia has had the hardest of childhoods out of all the girls and therefore she is brash and bitter, and I didn’t like her, she was so selfish, though by the end I was warming to her.

This was a cast of vivid and lively characters that will pull you into the high drama of their lives and keep you there as secrets are revealed bits at a time and you can’t wait to see what fate beholds them.

Rushby has captured the era extremely well, I felt like I had been transported back through time to the 1920’s. It’s all in the details and you can tell that Rushby has done her homework.

Interestingly, this was originally a series of six e-novellas and has now been brought together in one volume, and because of this, each section ends on a dramatic high note that will have you flipping straight over to the next section to see what is going to happen next.

A compelling and dramatic family saga, The Heiresses is perfect for those who love a good historical novel, especially one set in the 1920’s. I highly recommend it.

*for the older teen and up, does contain drinking, drug taking, sex and sexual references.

You can add it to your Goodreads here.

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